People: Chris Gardner, Partner

Photo of Chris Gardner, Partner

Chris Gardner

Partner

Melbourne
Direct: +61 3 9631 0711
0

Chris Gardner is a partner in the International Employment Law practice of Seyfarth Shaw Australia.  He is a workplace relations lawyer who assists leading employers on high stakes advice and litigation.  He has a particular passion for advising on workplace strategy and enterprise bargaining and representing employers in union related litigation.  But he also advises and represents employers in individual litigation such as termination of employment, adverse action and bullying.  He has worked with clients across sectors including construction, logistics, manufacturing, maritime, mining and telecommunications.

Chris features in Best Lawyers International for Labour and Employment since 2008 and in Chambers Global since 2010. His public comments are often sought after and he has spoken about:

  • good faith bargaining on Foxtel’s Law TV; and
  • bargaining climate on the Qantas Q Radio “Talking Business” program.

Chris Gardner is a partner in the International Employment Law practice of Seyfarth Shaw Australia.  He is a workplace relations lawyer who assists leading employers on high stakes advice and litigation.  He has a particular passion for advising on workplace strategy and enterprise bargaining and representing employers in union related litigation.  But he also advises and represents employers in individual litigation such as termination of employment, adverse action and bullying.  He has worked with clients across sectors including construction, logistics, manufacturing, maritime, mining and telecommunications.

Chris features in Best Lawyers International for Labour and Employment since 2008 and in Chambers Global since 2010. His public comments are often sought after and he has spoken about:

  • good faith bargaining on Foxtel’s Law TV; and
  • bargaining climate on the Qantas Q Radio “Talking Business” program.

Education

  • LL.B., Monash University in Melbourne

  • B.Ec., Monash University in Melbourne

Admissions

  • An Australian legal practitioner, admitted in Victoria (1994).

Affiliations

  • Australian Human Resources Institute
  • Industrial Relations Society of Victoria
  • Chair, AmCham Human Capital Committee

Representative Engagements

Chris has represented:
  • a major Australian telecommunications provider in respect of its workplace relations change strategy
  • a leading Australian stevedore in respect of its national enterprise bargaining campaign 
  • a leading warehouse and distribution provider in respect of union organized picketing conduct and related collective bargaining
  • an Australian manufacturer in respect of its desire to make a two tier enterprise agreement
  • a leading beverage manufacturer in respect of its bargaining campaign leading a termination of the bargaining and a workplace determination
  • a leading logistics provider in respect of its Greenfield Agreement strategy
  • a major retailer in a union coverage dispute with multiple proceedings in the Fair Work Commission and the Federal Circuit Court of Australia
  • a major retailer in the first Road Safety Remuneration Tribunal hearing for orders
His close association with clients’ businesses has seen Chris develop a reputation for having a strong understanding of client needs and providing pragmatic, solution-orientated advice.
 
He has been at the forefront of Australia’s current bargaining laws, having conducted research on the US good faith bargaining laws, and assisting many employers involved in challenging negotiations.
 

Publications

  • “Productivity Commission; Workplace Relations Framework review brings big changes,” Sydney Morning Hearld  (August 6,2015)
  • “Industrial relations system creates high-cost, low-productivity projects," Financial Review (May 26, 2015)
  • Contributing Author, The Workplace Relations Handbook: “A guide to the Workplace Relations Act 1996 (Cth),” Butterworths (2004)
  • “Where is Productivity Bargaining in Australia,” Commerce & Industry Magazine (Spring 2010)
  • “Short-term gain, long-term pain,” Matthew Stevens, Australia Financial Review (January 2013)